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4 Keys to Supporting Gut Health

People are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of gut health and how such common problems as leaky gut and food intolerances can cause symptoms throughout the body. These are just a few of the symptoms that originate in the gut:

  • Foggy brain
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Skin rashes
  • Difficulty losing weight
  • Headaches

To understand how leaky gut occurs and what you can do to heal your gut naturally, it helps to get to know your gut wall.

What Makes Up the Gut Lining?

The gut lining has four main layers:

  1. Mucosa
  2. Submucosa
  3. Muscularis propria
  4. Serosa

These layers are key to keeping the “outside” environment, meaning gut contents such as bacteria and food particles, separate from the “inside” environment of the bloodstream to avoid immune reactions or overreactions. Overstimulated immune responses play a role in the development of food intolerances, allergies, and autoimmune conditions.

Each of these layers has a slightly different structure and function.

Mucosa

The mucosa is the innermost layer. It’s made up of epithelial cells (cells that line surfaces of the body), glandular tissue, and loose connective tissue such as adipose, or fat, tissue. The latter is responsible for absorbing nutrients and secreting sticky mucus from the

4 Keys to Supporting Gut Health

People are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of gut health and how such common problems as leaky gut and food intolerances can cause symptoms throughout the body. These are just a few of the symptoms that originate in the gut:

  • Foggy brain
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Skin rashes
  • Difficulty losing weight
  • Headaches

To understand how leaky gut occurs and what you can do to heal your gut naturally, it helps to get to know your gut wall.

What Makes Up the Gut Lining?

The gut lining has four main layers:

  1. Mucosa
  2. Submucosa
  3. Muscularis propria
  4. Serosa

These layers are key to keeping the “outside” environment, meaning gut contents such as bacteria and food particles, separate from the “inside” environment of the bloodstream to avoid immune reactions or overreactions. Overstimulated immune responses play a role in the development of food intolerances, allergies, and autoimmune conditions.

Each of these layers has a slightly different structure and function.

Mucosa

The mucosa is the innermost layer. It’s made up of epithelial cells (cells that line surfaces of the body), glandular tissue, and loose connective tissue such as adipose, or fat, tissue. The latter is responsible for absorbing nutrients and secreting sticky mucus from the